Game Making

Talk about game development and programming, and let people know about your own projects!
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Filseld2000
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Game Making

Post by Filseld2000 » March 23rd, 2006, 9:17 am

Does anyone know what Ryan uses to make his games?
relax, we understand j00

Balloony
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Post by Balloony » March 23rd, 2006, 9:30 am

Microsoft Visual Basic 6 and DirectX 7 SDK (as far I know)
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Aloshi
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Post by Aloshi » March 23rd, 2006, 9:05 pm

Yup. I use Microsoft VB .NET. and be warned: they're 'bout $70...

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Qabach
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Post by Qabach » March 28th, 2006, 10:36 pm

I use Java (which is completely free). Which language you use is pretty much up to personal preference. Some people are almost religious about which language they use, but most of them will get the job done.
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Post by XGreendayX » March 28th, 2006, 11:42 pm

The only one that i have used is VB.
My site: Jgaming :D

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Post by Aloshi » March 29th, 2006, 12:45 am

Can someone gimme a link to Java? I feel like giving it a shot...

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Qabach
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Post by Qabach » March 29th, 2006, 5:10 am

Step 1: go to Sun and click the "Download JDK 5.0 Update 6" link. Accept the agreement and choose your operating system. Download/install the program and then go to step 2.

Step 2: find a compiler you like. I use Dr. Java because it has a lot of convenient features without being bogged down by too many extras. If you want something that's bare-bones, use TextPad(only works on Windows), or if you want something with features up the wazoo, get NetBeans. Following are links to the download sites for each:
Option #1-TextPad: Choose a language (probably English) and install the program, then you should be ready to go.
Option #2-Dr. Java: Take your pick between Windows and Mac Os X. I suggest that you take the "current stable release."
Option #3-NetBeans: Fill out the information and then proceed to download NetBeans and any add-ons that you want (the profiler is pretty neat).
There are many other compilers which will work, but those are the only ones I've used.

Step 3: Now you can get started. I suggest that you get farmiliar with the JavaDoc API documentation. With this handy tool, you can look up and learn to use all of the classes included in Java SE 5.0 (the first thing you downloaded).

If you have any specific questions, you can always ask me, but I'm still in the noob stage too so I can't garuntee that I'll know the answers.
“Someone told me that each equation I included in the book would halve the sales.”
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Post by Aloshi » March 30th, 2006, 4:21 pm

Okay, is there a step-by-step tutorial? I don't understand any of it. :*| I've got NetBeans, with its profiler. (Thanks for the links)

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Post by Balloony » March 30th, 2006, 4:29 pm

Just as a parenthesis: The probably most powerful language for game design is C++.
It is not free, but you can get sufficient compilers packed (MS Visual C++) with the newest DirectX SDK on a shoestring and there is plenty of acquirable extension software and upwardly, you won't be more unlimited in any other language. If you really want to get serious, this is your choice, though it truly isn't easy and needs to be dealt with consequently.
I actually bought a tutorial pack with SDK-CD and worked myself through the first chapters, but currently there is just no time to keep going, so I had to lay it down for the time being. Anyway, what I experienced in that short time of try was quite interesting and comprehensible.
"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana." -Groucho Marx

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Post by Qabach » April 1st, 2006, 11:23 pm

Yeah, C++ definitely has more than any other language. That is both its best selling point and the main reason a lot of people don't like to use it. The language is very comprehensive; there seems to be something for everything, but as you might imagine, that makes it extremely hard to learn and master. As for an all-in-one Java tutorial, I don't think i've ever heard of one, but I'm guessing that if you have a specific thing you want to do, you could find a tutorial for it.
You could, of course, do what 90% of people do and buy/steal C++ (I'm not endorsing theft, I just know that it happens a lot) If you're willing to spend the extra money, there is a program made by microsoft called "Visual C++" which can help you avoid some of the nitty-gritty of C++ (actually, I only know a couple people who use C++ at work without some kind of aid program) But don't think that Visual C++ will make things easy, you'll still have to do most of the work.
“Someone told me that each equation I included in the book would halve the sales.”
-Stephen Hawking

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